Beara Way Rambler Six Day Hike

Your Walking Holiday Includes:

Beara Way Rambler Six Day Itineary

Our driver can meet you on your arrival at Kerry Airport or Killarney for a private transfer to your first guesthouse to Lauragh. This afternoon you have the option to visit Derreen Gardens. Situated on the Atlantic Coast, Derreen Gardens are a 60 acre woodland garden offers miles of forest tracks winding through rare tropical plants. Lauragh is a quiet village but has two lovely cafés. Dinner is served at your guesthouse this evening.

Today’s hike is 13km. Your first day on the Beara Way begins along quiet country lanes towards Glanmore Lake with fine views of the surrounding Caha Mountains. We turn west at Croanshagh Bridge and enter the forest on the lowest slopes of Cummeennahillan Mountain.

A gradual ascent along a medieval road that once ran from Kenmare to Castletownbere brings you to the Cashelkeelty Standing Stones. The five stone circle megalithic monument was erected almost 3,000 years ago and it is marvelously located with its Atlantic backdrop. Shortly afterwards you descend before rising again to the pass between Drung Hill and Keecrah.

This is a particularly beautiful section of the hike and the wide panoramic views ahead never fail to delight us. Once you have descended the pass you have the opportunity to visit the Beara Gallery and this is a good place to take a rest.

After the Beara Gallery, you hike along the lower slopes of Coomacloghane and Tooreennamna Mountains and enjoy views out over Kenmare Bay. Soon you come to another of today’s highlights, the Ardgroom Stone Circle. An even larger circle than Cashelkeelty, the circle has 11 standing stones and in the vicinity are the remains of two ring forts.

By now you are only a short walk to your destination for today, Ardgroom Village. Ardgroom is a colorful one street village with a lovely pub and local café. For the more energetic it is possible to walk to nearby Glenbeg Lake, a 20-minute walk south east of Ardgroom.

Today’s hike (14km) can be divided into three stages, a ridge walk, a lake walk and finally a coastal walk. You leave Ardgroom, hiking north of the village and soon you are ascending to the low ridge of Cleanderry Mountain. Once on the ridge you can enjoy wide Atlantic views to your right and the majestic mountains of Lackawee and Maulin on your left. Dropping down from the ridge, a short stretch of quiet road is soon replaced by a trail through tall grass as you skirt the shores of Lough Fadda, a popular Anglers spot due to its plentiful brown trout.

With the lake behind you a short section on surfaced road offers views of the nearby Ballycrovane Ogham Stone, which at 5.3m, is the tallest Ogham Stone in Europe. Ogham is an ancient Irish written language, consisting of inscriptions on stone monuments, it is thought to have originated in the 4th century AD.

You now enter the final stage of today’s hike which takes you along the Atlantic shore. Part of the Beara Way here is also part the Eyeries Heritage Trail, and one of the most interesting sections is the Ballycrovane Coastguard Station which was the scene of a raid during the 1920 War of Independence.

The shores along this section is very pleasant with the waves crashing against the rocks below. Soon the bright houses of Eyeries Village can be seen in the distance and we depart the coast to enter the village. Eyeries is a picture-perfect village and was voted the place where most Irish people would choose to live. Eyeries has a number of pubs and a choice of places to dine this evening.

Today’s trail is 13km. The trail leaves Eyeries along quiet country lanes. Once you reach Coulagh, you leave the country lanes and the trail climbs to bring us onto the slopes of Miskish Mountain. The views over the valley below and out over the Atlantic improve with each step. On a clear day the Skellig Islands come into view. The trail drops down to a lower stream before climbing up the slopes of Knockgour.

After a while you begin to see the remains of the old Copper Mines industry. Allihies and the surrounding area was a thriving mining town during the 18th Century. Up ahead is the pass that leads you down into the Allihies Valley. Once over the pass, the scale of the old mining industry becomes clear with the old engine rooms being particularly striking.  The Beara Way continues its descent and the brightly painted house of Allihies Village soon come into view. Depending on the time of your arrival try and make time to visit the Copper Mine Museum which details the fascinating history of the mining industry in Allihies.

Today’s hike is 15km. A gentle start to the day as you leave Allihies along various tracks and trails. Once you reach the remains of the Kealoge Mine, the trail begins to climb and there are good views of the valley and the bright colors of Allihies Village can be seen in the distance. As you continue your ascent the masts of Knockgour become closer and make sure to turn around to appreciate the views of Dursey Island and the wide Atlantic panorama behind you.

At the 250m contour the trail begins to level and enters an area of forestry. Your views are now to the south and recent forestry clearance has opened up the area. Once you reach the Gour viewing point, your first sighting of Castletownbere and Bere Island are clearly seen as well as the Sheep’s Head Peninsula and Bantry Bay. The trail turns north and at the Teernahilane Ridge you get the widest vistas.

To the north the colors of Eyeries Village, Kenmare Bay and the Iveragh Peninsula, while looking south the Sheep’s Head, Bere Island and even the Mizen Penisula can be seen. From the ridge the trail ascends towards the summit of Miskish before running east and beginning the continuous decent into Castletownbere. Just before arriving in the town, you get the opportunity to visit the Derreenataggart Stone Circle, which is not to be missed. Shortly afterwards you arrive in Castletown, the largest village so far with its wonderful choice of pubs, restaurants and living fishing port.

You can choose to hike as little or as long as you wish on Bere Island but we have a lovely 8km or 14km route to follow.

We find that the short 15 minute boat journey to Bere Island is always magical, and this sheltered harbor makes for a gentle crossing on most days. Once landed you follow the Beara Way towards the lighthouse. The peace of the Island and the stunning views back on the mainland bring joy every time we hike here.

The fishing boats from Castletownbere often pass by as they make their way through the narrow channel and out into the Atlantic. After about an hour the lighthouse and its dramatic location come into view. It’s a magical spot and looking south the tips of the Sheep’s Head and Mizen Peninsula come into view.

You are looking at the most westerly corner of Ireland framed by the never-ending Atlantic Ocean. It’s difficult to bring yourself to leave this spot but there is plenty more to see as the Beara Way continues it ascent to the ridge. On the ridge you get to enjoy view over the entire Island, back to the mainland and to the north the Iveragh Peninsula. The route is very well marked on Bere Island and with many daily ferries you can choose to return at your preferred time. Our driver can meet you back at your guesthouse and bring you to your onward connection at Kerry Airport or Killarney.

Booking and Rates

The price of the Six Day Beara Way Ramber Walking Holiday is 695 per person sharing.

You can check our availability below or go to our Booking Form to make a reservation.

Check Our Availability

Official Member of Failte Ireland

Failte Ireland

Subscribe to Our Newsletter

Wonderful Ireland Walking Holidays

63 Dundrum Gate,

Dundrum,

Dublin 16

D16 EY00

Republic of Ireland

  

Company Number 397494 

VAT Number 6417494G

Beara Way Rambler Six Days: Lauragh to Castletownbere

What's Included

Beara Way Walking Holidays

Itineary of the Beara Way Rambler Six Day Walking Holiday

Our driver can meet you on your arrival at Kerry Airport or Killarney for a private transfer to your first guesthouse to Lauragh. This afternoon you have the option to visit Derreen Gardens. Situated on the Atlantic Coast, Derreen Gardens are a 60 acre woodland garden offers miles of forest tracks winding through rare tropical plants. Lauragh is a quiet village but has two lovely cafés. Dinner is served at your guesthouse this evening.

Your first day on the Beara Way begins along quiet country lanes towards Glanmore Lake with fine views of the surrounding Caha Mountains. We turn west at Croanshagh Bridge and enter the forest on the lowest slopes of Cummeennahillan Mountain. A gradual ascent along a medieval road that once ran from Kenmare to Castletownbere brings you to the Cashelkeelty Standing Stones. The five stone circle megalithic monument was erected almost 3,000 years ago and it is marvelously located with its Atlantic backdrop. Shortly afterwards you descend before rising again to the pass between Drung Hill and Keecrah.

This is a particularly beautiful section of the hike and the wide panoramic views ahead never fail to delight us. Once you have descended the pass you have the opportunity to visit the Beara Gallery and this is a good place to take a rest.

After the Beara Gallery, you hike along the lower slopes of Coomacloghane and Tooreennamna Mountains and enjoy views out over Kenmare Bay. Soon you come to another of today’s highlights, the Ardgroom Stone Circle. An even larger circle than Cashelkeelty, the circle has 11 standing stones and in the vicinity are the remains of two ring forts. By now you are only a short walk to your destination for today, Ardgroom Village. Ardgroom is a colorful one street village with a lovely pub and local café. For the more energetic it is possible to walk to nearby Glenbeg Lake, a 20-minute walk south east of Ardgroom.

Today’s hike can be divided into three stages, a ridge walk, a lake walk and finally a coastal walk. You leave Ardgroom, hiking north of the village and soon you are ascending to the low ridge of Cleanderry Mountain. Once on the ridge you can enjoy wide Atlantic views to your right and the majestic mountains of Lackawee and Maulin on your left. Dropping down from the ridge, a short stretch of quiet road is soon replaced by a trail through tall grass as you skirt the shores of Lough Fadda, a popular Anglers spot due to its plentiful brown trout.

With the lake behind you a short section on surfaced road offers views of the nearby Ballycrovane Ogham Stone, which at 5.3m, is the tallest Ogham Stone in Europe. Ogham is an ancient Irish written language, consisting of inscriptions on stone monuments, it is thought to have originated in the 4th century AD.

You now enter the final stage of today’s hike which takes you along the Atlantic shore. Part of the Beara Way here is also part the Eyeries Heritage Trail, and one of the most interesting sections is the Ballycrovane Coastguard Station which was the scene of a raid during the 1920 War of Independence. The shores along this section is very pleasant with the waves crashing against the rocks below. Soon the bright houses of Eyeries Village can be seen in the distance and we depart the coast to enter the village. Eyeries is a picture-perfect village and was voted the place where most Irish people would choose to live. Eyeries has a number of pubs and a choice of places to dine this evening.

The trail leaves Eyeries along quiet country lanes. Once you reach Coulagh, you leave the country lanes and the trail climbs to bring us onto the slopes of Miskish Mountain. The views over the valley below and out over the Atlantic improve with each step. On a clear day the Skellig Islands come into view. The trail drops down to a lower stream before climbing up the slopes of Knockgour. After a while you begin to see the remains of the old Copper Mines industry. Allihies and the surrounding area was a thriving mining town during the 18th Century.

Up ahead is the pass that leads you down into the Allihies Valley. Once over the pass, the scale of the old mining industry becomes clear with the old engine rooms being particularly striking.  The Beara Way continues its descent and the brightly painted house of Allihies Village soon come into view. Depending on the time of your arrival try and make time to visit the Copper Mine Museum which details the fascinating history of the mining industry in Allihies.

A gentle start to the day as you leave Allihies along various tracks and trails. Once you reach the remains of the Kealoge Mine, the trail begins to climb and there are good views of the valley and the bright colors of Allihies Village can be seen in the distance. As you continue your ascent the masts of Knockgour become closer and make sure to turn around to appreciate the views of Dursey Island and the wide Atlantic panorama behind you.

At the 250m contour the trail begins to level and enters an area of forestry. Your views are now to the south and recent forestry clearance has opened up the area. Once you reach the Gour viewing point, your first sighting of Castletownbere and Bere Island are clearly seen as well as the Sheep’s Head Peninsula and Bantry Bay. The trail turns north and at the Teernahilane Ridge you get the widest vistas. To the north the colors of Eyeries Village, Kenmare Bay and the Iveragh Peninsula, while looking south the Sheep’s Head, Bere Island and even the Mizen Penisula can be seen.

From the ridge the trail ascends towards the summit of Miskish before running east and beginning the continuous decent into Castletownbere. Just before arriving in the town, you get the opportunity to visit the Derreenataggart Stone Circle, which is not to be missed. Shortly afterwards you arrive in Castletown, the largest village so far with its wonderful choice of pubs, restaurants and living fishing port.

We find the short 15 minute boat journey to Bere Island is unfortgetable , and this sheltered harbor makes for a gentle crossing on most days. Once landed you follow the Beara Way towards the lighthouse. The peace of the Island and the stunning views back on the mainland bring joy every time we hike here. The fishing boats from Castletownbere often pass by as they make their way through the narrow channel and out into the Atlantic. After about an hour the lighthouse and its dramatic location come into view.

It’s a magical spot and looking south the tips of the Sheep’s Head and Mizen Peninsula come into view. You are looking at the most westerly corner of Ireland framed by the never-ending Atlantic Ocean. It’s difficult to bring yourself to leave this spot but there is plenty more to see as the Beara Way continues it ascent to the ridge. On the ridge you get to enjoy view over the entire Island, back to the mainland and to the north the Iveragh Peninsula. The route is very well marked on Bere Island and with many daily ferries you can choose to return at your preferred time. Our driver can meet you back at your guesthouse and bring you to your onward connection at Kerry Airport or Killarney (or Cork also)*.

Check Our Beara Way Walking Holiday Availability

Booking and Rates

Official Member of Failte Ireland

Failte Ireland

Subscribe to Our Newsletter

Wonderful Ireland Walking Holidays

63 Dundrum Gate,

Dundrum,

Dublin 16

D16 EY00

Republic of Ireland  

Company Number 397494 

VAT Number 6417494G