Dingle Way One Week Hiking

Your Walking Holiday Includes:

Dingle Way One Week Itineary

We’ll meet you at Kerry Airport or Tralee train station and take you to your first guesthouse in the Camp. After you’ve had the chance to settle in you can enjoy a delightful local beach walk. The walk follows the coast for the first half and the views back towards the Slieve Mish mountains are breath-taking. You have the choice of three pubs to visit tonight and the proximity to the coast allows wonderful Atlantic sea views.

After returning to the Dingle Way, the trail begins to climb as it reaches close to Knockbrack mountain (266m). You are now crossing from the north to the south of the peninsula and views across the Atlantic to the Iveragh peninsula can be seen. Inch beach marks the perfect picnic spot and a drink can also be enjoyed at Sammy’s pub on the beach. Inch beach is over 5km (3 miles) and is popular location in fine weather. Leaving Inch the trail ascends towards Knockafeehane (301m) and suddenly Annascaul village comes into view along with the high mountains of the peninsula’s central spine. Annascaul village has a number of pubs, most famously the South Pole Inn, run by Antarctic explorer Tom Cream and contains a small museum to his fascinating life. 

The first section of today’s walk offers fine views over Annascaul valley before turning south towards Minard Castle. This 16th century Fitzgerlad castle is situated with commanding views over the Atlantic. Turning inland quiet county lanes take you to the small village of Lispole with its fine church and great views of the old Dingle railway. A small cafe offers the chance for a break before setting off for more inland terrain. Old farm dwellings and agricultural land gives way as you cross the lower slopes of Maol Mor. The higher ground allows for sweeping vistas over the southern coast and the Atlantic beyond. Eventually Dingle town and harbour come into view and excitement builds as we enter the liveliest town on the trail. This evening the best choice of restaurants, cafes, pubs and music can be enjoyed. If you are going to have a big night out, this is the place for it, enjoy

If last night was a late one do not worry. This morning we offer the option of a transfer to Ventry. This shortens today’s walk to 16km and takes out the initial road section from Dingle. From Ventry you have a beautiful 3km beach overlooked by the ever present Eagle Mountain. Soon after the beach the trail offers the opportunity to visit the Pre-historic Celtic museum, a small but fascinating place showcasing a large collection of artefacts from the Jurassic, Stone & Bronze ages and Celtic & Viking eras too. It also includes the only genuine fossil Woolly Mammoth skeleton in Ireland. Moving on the trail now begins to ascend and one of the most dramatic sections of the Dingle Way begins. Follow the sides slopes of Mount Eagle and sweeping Atlantic views south towards the Skellig and Valentia Islands soon give way to the mush closer Blasket Islands. You have now reached the most westerly point in Europe. The seven Blasket Islands jutting out of the Wild Atlantic are a sight that will stay with you forever. You ow descend towards Slea Head, and beautiful Coumenoole Beach is clearly in view. As luck with have it, a small cafe offers the chance to savour the magnificent panorama before embarking on the final 3km into Dunquin. Dinner is served at your guesthouse tonight and Kruggers pub, the most westerly pub in Europe offers the chance of a well deserved drink.

Close by your guesthouse is the excellent Blasket Islands Musuem and we recommend even just a short visit before setting off for the day. Today is long but there is virtually no ascent, and this will allow for good progress. Not long out of Dunquin, you come to the famous Louis Mulcahy pottery studios and a visit is well recommended. It also has a delightful cafe if you feel like a break. Across from the studio is Clogher beach, a beautiful horseshoe beach with fine clear sands. From Clogher, country roads take us to Dun an Oir, the site of a 1580 massacre between English and mainly Spanish & Italian soldiers who were supporting the local Desmond Rebelion. The site marks the start of Smerick Harbour and for the next 7km the Dingle Way follows the coast and long sandy beaches. The local scenery is relaxed but all around are the high peaks of the Brandon Mountain Range as well as nearby Ceann Sibeal mountain, site of the recently filmed Star Wars movies. The beach brings us to the small but wonderfully situated village of Ballydavid. Both village pubs offer wonderful coastal views and a break here is recommended. From Ballydavid, a meandering cliff trail offers breath-taking Atlantic coastal views before moving inland along riverside trails and tracks to reach your guesthouse for tonight.

In contrast with yesterday, the first section of today is all about ascent. From sea level you ascend to 630m at the pass at Mastiompan before descending to the small village of Brandon on the other side. The views today are unparalleled and initially cover almost the entire western Dingle peninsula and then on the descent the views give way to the east and cover the entire coast as far as Tralee. The terrain today is open countryside but, on the descent, it gives way to a clear track for most of the way down the mountain. Today is the most challenging day on the trail and there is the option of a lower crossing if you prefer. Once off the mountain you reach the small village of Brandon where there is a great coastal pub, and you can enjoy a fireside drink before embarking on the final few kilometres into Cloghane. A great day and a great sense of achievement can be had this evening.

If your train or plane is not until later this afternoon, you will have time to enjoy the next section of the Dingle Way to Fahamore. The inital 7km out of Cloghane are on the road so we can bring you to Fermoyle beach and you can enjoy an uninterrupted 11km coastal walk along Ireland’s longest beach. The walk finishes at Fahamore and our driver can meet you at one of the two pubs there and bring you onto Tralee or Kerry Airport at a time of your choosing. A relaxing and peaceful end to a marvellous week’s hiking the Dingle Way.

Booking and Rates

The price of the One Week Dingle Way Walking Holiday is 795 per person sharing.

You can check our availability below or go to our Booking Form to make a reservation.

Check Our Walking Holiday Availability

Official Member of Failte Ireland

Failte Ireland

Subscribe to Our Newsletter

Wonderful Ireland Walking Holidays

63 Dundrum Gate,

Dundrum,

Dublin 16

D16 EY00

Republic of Ireland  

Company Number 397494 

VAT Number 6417494G

Dingle Way One Week: Camp to Cloghane

What's Included

Dingle Way Walking Holidays

Itineary of the Dingle Way One Week Walking Holiday

We’ll meet you at Kerry Airport or Tralee train station and take you to your first guesthouse in the Camp. After you’ve had the chance to settle in you can enjoy a delightful local beach walk. The walk follows the coast for the first half and the views back towards the Slieve Mish mountains are breath-taking. You have the choice of three pubs to visit tonight and the proximity to the coast allows wonderful Atlantic sea views.

After returning to the Dingle Way, the trail begins to climb as it reaches close to Knockbrack mountain (266m). You are now crossing from the north to the south of the peninsula and views across the Atlantic to the Iveragh peninsula can be seen. Inch beach marks the perfect picnic spot and a drink can also be enjoyed at Sammy’s pub on the beach. Inch beach is over 5km (3 miles) and is popular location in fine weather. Leaving Inch the trail ascends towards Knockafeehane (301m) and suddenly Annascaul village comes into view along with the high mountains of the peninsula’s central spine. Annascaul village has a number of pubs, most famously the South Pole Inn, run by Antarctic explorer Tom Cream and contains a small museum to his fascinating life. 

The first section of today’s walk offers fine views over Annascaul valley before turning south towards Minard Castle. This 16th century Fitzgerlad castle is situated with commanding views over the Atlantic. Turning inland quiet county lanes take you to the small village of Lispole with its fine church and great views of the old Dingle railway. A small cafe offers the chance for a break before setting off for more inland terrain. Old farm dwellings and agricultural land gives way as you cross the lower slopes of Maol Mor. The higher ground allows for sweeping vistas over the southern coast and the Atlantic beyond. Eventually Dingle town and harbour come into view and excitement builds as we enter the liveliest town on the trail. This evening the best choice of restaurants, cafes, pubs and music can be enjoyed. If you are going to have a big night out, this is the place for it, enjoy !

If last night was a late one do not worry. This morning we offer the option of a transfer to Ventry. This shortens today’s walk to 16km and takes out the initial road section from Dingle. From Ventry you have a beautiful 3km beach overlooked by the ever present Eagle Mountain. Soon after the beach the trail offers the opportunity to visit the Pre-historic Celtic musuem, a small but fascinating place showcasing a large collection of artefacts from the Jurassic, Stone & Bronze ages and Celtic & Viking eras too. It also includes the only genuine fossil Woolly Mammoth skeleton in Ireland. Moving on the trail now begins to ascend and one of the most dramatic sections of the Dingle Way begins. Folloiw the sides slopes of Mount Eagle and sweeping Atlantic views south towards the Skellig and Valentia Islands soon give way to the mush closer Blasket Islands. You have now reached the most westerly point in Europe. The seven Blasket Islands jutting out of the Wild Atlantic are a sight that will stay with you forever. You ow descend towards Slea Head, and beautiful Coumenoole Beach is clearly in view. As luck with have it, a small cafe offers the chance to savour the magnificant panorama before embarking on the final 3km into Dunquin. Dinner is served at your guesthouse tonight and Kruggers pub, the most westerly pub in Europe offers the chance of a well deserved drink.

Close by your guesthouse is the excellent Blasket Islands Musuem and we recommend even just a short visit before setting off for the day. Today is long but there is virtually no ascent, and this will allow for good progress. Not long out of Dunquin, you come to the famous Louis Mulcahy pottery studios and a visit is well recommended. It also has a delightful cafe if you feel like a break. Across from the studio is Clogher beach, a beautiful horseshoe beach with fine clear sands. From Clogher, country roads take us to Dun an Oir, the site of a 1580 massacre between English and mainly Spanish & Italian soldiers who were supporting the local Desmond Rebelion. The site marks the start of Smerick Harbour and for the next 7km the Dingle Way follows the coast and long sandy beaches. The local scenery is relaxed but all around are the high peaks of the Brandon Mountain Range as well as nearby Ceann Sibeal mountain, site of the recently filmed Star Wars movies. The beach brings us to the small but wonderfully situated village of Ballydavid. Both village pubs offer wonderful coastal views and a break here is recommended. From Ballydavid, a meandering cliff trail offers breath-taking Atlantic coastal views before moving inland along riverside trails and tracks to reach your guesthouse for tonight.

In contrast with yesterday, the first section of today is all about ascent. From sea level you ascend to 630m at the pass at Mastiompan before descending to the small village of Brandon on the other side. The views today are unparalleled and initially cover almost the entire western Dingle peninsula and then on the descent the views give way to the east and cover the entire coast as far as Tralee. The terrain today is open countryside but, on the descent, it gives way to a clear track for most of the way down the mountain. Today is the most challenging day on the trail and there is the option of a lower crossing if you prefer. Once off the mountain you reach the small village of Brandon where there is a great coastal pub, and you can enjoy a fireside drink before embarking on the final few kilometres into Cloghane. A great day and a great sense of achievement can be had this evening.

If your train or plane is not until later this afternoon, you will have time to enjoy the next section of the Dingle Way to Fahamore. The inital 7km out of Cloghane are on the road so we can bring you to Fermoyle beach and you can enjoy an uninterrupted 11km coastal walk along Ireland’s longest beach. The walk finishes at Fahamore and our driver can meet you at one of the two pubs there and bring you onto Tralee or Kerry Airport at a time of your choosing. A relaxing and peaceful end to a marvellous week’s hiking the Dingle Way.

Check Our Availability

Booking and Rates

Official Member of Failte Ireland

Failte Ireland

Subscribe to Our Newsletter

Wonderful Ireland Walking Holidays

63 Dundrum Gate,

Dundrum,

Dublin 16

D16 EY00

Republic of Ireland  

Company Number 397494 

VAT Number 6417494G